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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Apollo, Augustus, and the poets found in the catalog.

Apollo, Augustus, and the poets

Miller, John F.

Apollo, Augustus, and the poets

by Miller, John F.

  • 113 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Apollo (Greek deity) in literature,
  • Civilization,
  • Themes, motives,
  • Latin poetry,
  • History and criticism,
  • Influence

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [374]-397) and indexes.

    StatementJohn F. Miller
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA6029.A6 M55 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 408 p. :
    Number of Pages408
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24893573M
    ISBN 100521516838
    ISBN 109780521516839
    LC Control Number2010275430
    OCLC/WorldCa299718521

    The Temple of Apollo Palatinus ('Palatine Apollo') was a temple on the Palatine Hill of ancient Rome, which was first dedicated by Augustus to his patron god was only the second temple in Rome dedicated to the god, after the Temple of Apollo was sited next to the Temple of to excavations in , it was generally thought to be the Temple of Jupiter Victor. Finally, Chapters 7 looks at book 4 of Propertius, examining in particular the elegist’s response to the connection between Apollo and Augustus in contemporary literature and elsewhere, as well as the poet’s anticipation of the formal deification of Augustus.

      The Museum of Augustus: The Temple of Apollo in Pompeii, the Portico of Philippus in Rome, and Latin Poetry 1st Edition by Peter Heslin (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important? ISBN. It's striking how much the festivities of Book 5 in which Aeneas and his men honored Anchises's death resemble Virgil's version of paradise. The emphasis on culture and the arts (the music, dancing, and poets) also approvingly link the scene to Augustus Caesar, as he was a .

    The Museum of Augustus first provides a comprehensive reconstruction of paintings from the remaining fragments of the cycle of Trojan frescoes that once decorated the Temple of Apollo in Pompeii. It then finds the echoes of these paintings in the Augustan-dated Portico of Philippus, now destroyed, which was itself a renovation of Rome’s de. “Metamorophoses” (“Transformations”) is a narrative poem in fifteen books by the Roman poet Ovid, completed in 8 CE. It is an epic (or “mock-epic”) poem describing the creation and history of the world, incorporating many of the best known and loved stories from Greek mythology, although centring more on mortal characters than on heroes or the gods.


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Apollo, Augustus, and the poets by Miller, John F. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Contemporary poets variously responded to this appropriation of Phoebus Apollo, and the poets book participating in the construction of an imperial symbolism and resisting that ideological project. This book. Book Description Augustus claimed Apollo as a patron, and poets of the age responded to the idea in different ways.

This book is a comprehensive treatment of the reflections by Augustan poets on Apollo as an imperial icon, both in relation to one another and against the background of contemporary by:   Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets by John F. Miller, Paperback | Barnes & Noble® The Paperback of the Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets by John F.

Miller at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more. Due to COVID, orders may be : John F. Miller. Apollo's importance in the religion of the Roman state was markedly heightened by the emperor Augustus, who claimed a special affiliation with the god. Contemporary poets variously responded to this appropriation of Phoebus Apollo, both participating in the construction of an imperial symbolism and resisting that ideological project.

This book offers a synoptic study of 'Augustan' Apollo in. Book Description Augustus claimed Apollo as a patron, and poets of the age responded to the idea in different ways. This book is a comprehensive treatment of the reflections by Augustan poets on Apollo as an imperial icon, both in relation to one another and against the background of contemporary : John F.

Miller. Apollo, And the poets book, and the Poets – By John F. Miller. James J. O'Hara. The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Search for more papers by this author. James J. O'Hara. The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Search for more papers by this author. First published: 10 June Author: James J.

O'Hara. Augustus claimed Apollo as a patron, and poets of the age responded to the idea in different ways. This book is a comprehensive treatment of the reflections by Augustan poets on Apollo as an imperial icon, both in relation to one another and against the background of contemporary evidence.

Review of J. Miller, Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets. - Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets John F. Miller Frontmatter More information. Acknowledgements It has been my good fortune to have had the help of many people while researching and writing this book, to all of whom I am extremely grateful.

© in this web service Cam bridge University Press Cambridge Unive rsit y Pre ss - Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets John F. Miller Excerpt More information Horace chooses Apollo to illustrate the maxim, and why he focalizes Apollo as terrible bowman in the mind of his addressee.

Buy Apollo, Augustus, and the Poets by John F. Miller from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £ Augustus claimed Apollo as a patron, and poets of the age responded to the idea in different ways.

This book is a comprehensive treatment of the reflections by Augustan poets on Apollo as an imperial icon, both in relation to one another and against the background of contemporary : John F.

Miller. Overview Apollo's importance in the religion of the Roman state was markedly heightened by the emperor Augustus, who claimed a special affiliation with the god.

Contemporary poets variously responded to this appropriation of Phoebus Apollo, both participating in the construction of an imperial symbolism and resisting that ideological : $   It next examines the responses of the Augustan poets to the decorative program of this monument that was intimately connected with their own literary aspirations.

The book concludes by looking at the way Horace in the Odes and Virgil in the Georgics both conceptualized their poetic projects as temples to rival the museum of Augustus. Contemporary poets variously responded to this appropriation of Phoebus Apollo, both participating in the construction of an imperial symbolism and resisting that ideological project.

This book offers a synoptic study of 'Augustan' Apollo in Augustan poetry. Apollo's importance in the religion of the Roman state was markedly heightened by the emperor Augustus, who claimed a special affiliation with the god.

Contemporary poets variously responded to this appropriation of Phoebus Apollo, both participating in the construction of an imperial symbolism and resisting that ideological project.

between Augustus and Apollo ever present in the Roman mind, Apollo held a particular political weight for Augustan poets. Broad generalizations about Ovid’s use of Apollo can greatly miss the intricacy of his references to the god, but a careful examination of.

3 Note, however, that in the Aeneid, too, Augustus is located not only in the middle of the shield of Aeneas ( in medio; cf. Barchiesi, A., ‘ Virgilian narrative: ecphrasis ’, in Martindale, C. (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Virgil (), ), but also roughly in the middle of the poem, in the Heldenschau at the end of Book 6, where he is in turn located roughly in the middle.

Ovid, Roman poet noted especially for his Ars amatoria and Metamorphoses. His verse had immense influence both by its imaginative interpretations of Classical myth and as an example of supreme technical accomplishment.

Learn more about Ovid’s life and work. In Latin literature, Augustan poetry is the poetry that flourished during the reign of Caesar Augustus as Emperor of Rome, most notably including the works of Virgil, Horace, and English literature, Augustan poetry is a branch of Augustan literature, and refers to the poetry of the 18th century, specifically the first half of the term comes most originally from a term that.

study devoted to Apollo in Latin poetry."3 And in the year that Miller's book appeared, Fritz Graf could write in his own excellent introductory study of the god, "There are very few books on Apollo."4 But perhaps this is not surprising. As Miller amply demonstrates, to write such a book.

The winning of the ultimate military honour of spolia opima, spoils taken personally from an enemy commander killed by a Roman commander, traditionally occurred only three times in Roman history, the winners being Romulus in the legendary period, A.

Cornelius Cossus in either or and M. Claudius Marcellus in B.C. 1 The dedication-place of these special spoils was the temple of.the Secular Games in 17 B.C.E. In it Horace enlists the divine aid of Apollo, patron god of Augustus himself, and of Diana to look favorably on a newly restored Rome.

Like these great poets of the age, Ovid owed his career to the Pax Augusta. On the other hand, he was a younger, “second generation”.